Archive for December 11th, 2017

Product DetailsMy daughter and I are just about to finish reading Of Mice and Men by John Steinbeck.   I read it when I was in 7th or 8th grade.  I knew it was a classic because we had to read it.  As I got older and tended to read more books of my choosing, I did go back and read other John Steinbeck books and loved them.  The way he writes is beautiful.   There are so many books to read (just take a look at everyone’s TBR lists), how do we define a classic?  I remember everything about Of Mice and Men (and it was a VERY long time ago that I read it).  Was it because of my teachers?  Was it because of the the books they chose to teach?  Was it because of the writing? And, are what books are considered classics today?  (I would certainly put The Book Thief on my new classics list)

While most children are not still read to at the ages of 12 and 15, I know that my kids don’t mind it.  I also know that we read books that they never would have picked on their own.  I usually give them a choice of about 5-7 books.  If we don’t like it after a few chapters, we agree to stop.  My daughter and I have read Jane Eyre and Great Expectations.  My son and I are currently reading The Land of Oz, and next on our list is Tom Sawyer and/or The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn.  I know for a fact that he would NEVER read these books on his own.  What classics are you reading to your children.  I would love to make a new TBR list of classics to read.

Yet, another reason to read to your kids as long as possible.  It’s not just about picture books.

Happy Reading!

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