Archive for January, 2018

My parents bring me Architectural Digest magazines whenever they get them.  I love to look through the beautiful houses and gardens.  I often rip pages out and save them for our “someday house”.  This month’s issue was no exception.  An article about a family with seven children in Oxfordshire, England had a picture of their dining room.  On one wall was a huge painting of a page from Dr. Suess’  Oh the Places You’ll Go.  Simply perfect!  And, this idea doesn’t have to wait for our “someday house”!

Happy Reading!

Image result for architectural digest albert louden

 

 

Share

I read this blog post from Parnassus Books https://parnassusmusing.net/2018/01/17/14-picture-books-kind-citizens/#more-28438  If you aren’t currently signed up to receive the “musings” from Parnassus Books, I highly suggest you do.

This particlular post was about books to read with children showing them to be kind to one another.  I got to the book Love by Matt de la Pena.  I haven’t read the book yet, but I did link to the article in Time Magazine http://time.com/5093669/why-we-shouldnt-shield-children-from-darkness/.  This article is so beautiful, and so important.  Books can transport readers.  If one book, one illustration, can help a child to “feel” than it was worth it.  Often times, children do not have words to express how they are feeling.  Books can help them find those words.  By reading them with your children, you can also have discussions about the characters feelings, and usually get a glimpse into what your child is feeling.

Five years ago was the Sandy Hook shooting.  My son was in 1st grade at the time – the same age and grade as all those beautiful angels.  At first, my husband and I chose not to say anything to our children.  But, of course, our son, was up with the sun the next morning and watching the news.  Fortunately, he talked to us about it.  We explained what had happened.  We could not reassure either of our children that it would not happen to them, but we were able to talk about our fears, which was the best thing we could do at the time.  By being able to express our feelings with our children we were able to give their feelings a voice, too.  Many children do not have that opportunity.  For this, we have books.

Kate DiCamillo writes a beautiful response to Matt de la Pena.  (http://time.com/5099463/kate-dicamillo-kids-books-sad/)  She talks about recognition.  A recognition of her feelings.  If children can feel that their emotions are recognized and validated in a book, it makes it that much easier for them to express themselves.  These articles are so important, not just because they are validating what these authors are doing, but because they are helping children to express themselves.

Reading aloud to children on a regular basis can give them so much.  One of the reasons it is so important to me is I feel it is a stepping stone to discussions with my children, sometimes about difficult subjects, and sometimes we just laugh about things that happened in the book.  No matter the reason, if it helps your child to connect with his or her own feelings, then keep reading!

Happy Reading!

Share

What Made Maddy Run: The Secret Struggles and Tragic Death of an All-American Teen Cover Imagehttp://www.elmstreetbooks.com/book/9780316356541

A friend recommended this book to me.  She did warn me that it was intense.  It is very well written.  Kate Fagan tries to understand what was happening to Maddy through texts, social media posts and talking with her friends and family.  Nobody will ever know what was happening inside Maddy’s mind, and that is heartbreaking.  This is an important read for parents and teenagers, and for teachers and coaches.

In this fast paced, pressured world for our children, please know that NOTHING is more important that your life.  I don’t imagine that there is any parent, coach, teacher, professor, brother, sister, or friend that would disagree.  Please know that there is always someone to talk to, and if that person cannot help, they will help you to find someone who can.

I’d like to say Happy Reading, but it isn’t right.  I welcome comments.

Share

Ok, I’m back.  We had Christmas and New Year’s and a whole lot of sitting around by the fire, plus shoveling out of Snowmageddon and dealing with the bitter cold.  Plus, I started a Whole30 (3rd time, so I know what to expect).

My son and I finished The Land of Oz by L. Frank Baum (#2 in The Wizard of Oz series).  I went to the library and got about half a dozen new choices for our next book – including The Legend of Bagger Vance (my son is a golfer), Huckleberry Finn, and Tom Sawyer.  He barely looked at any of the choices.  He wanted me to go back and get the next in The Wizard of Oz series!  And, he wants me to read all 13!  He very rarely requests books!  So exciting!

The Land of Oz is much like the first one with a group of new friends going on an adventure.  I found the characters in this one to be much more entertaining.  Tip, a young boy, creates Jack Pumpkinhead, and they begin their journey, along with the Saw Horse that they made together.  Along the way, they meet HM Woggle Bug, TE (Highly Magnified Woggle Bug, Thoroughly Educated – because, before he was magnified, he hung out in a college classroom.)  More characters come along the way in their search for the real Princess of the Land of Oz.

This book was published in 1904.  Its a fun read, good vocabulary and great characters and plot, with a little suspense.  I highly recommend!

Happy Reading!

Share